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The Rise of Nishi!
01-16-2016, 04:44 PM
Post: #1
Brick The Rise of Nishi!
It is officially 2016 and I decided to divide from my original build thread since it consisted of 7 pages of vehicles that ended up being sold for the better of a completely new build. (If you want to know what I was doing in 2015, and learn what led up to this, then go to http://upstate4x4.com/thread-438.html.)


Like my other two little rigs, Koji (which meant "little one") and Kaiya (which meant "forgiving"), I decided the best name for the new rig would be Nishi (NISH-ee, "from the west / life after death").

Reason behind the name is because this is originally a NorCal Rig (still has the cali green sticker from 2012) which over the course of a few years has made its way all the way over to the east. And of course, sticking with the Japanese theme...

Welcome home NISHI!!!

A little info on the rig from what I can gather. Built professionally by a shop to meet Cali regulations. I believe it was full bodied at this point (had internal roll cage, no external roll cage). The green sticker is covered by the exocage which would NOT fly in cali, plus the welds on the cage look a little less professional than the frame welds. My guess is the exo came about when it lived in Tennessee.

Engine
Rebuilt 1.3L (60 hp)
Myside Carb/intake with Harley Carb (Passes Cali emissions)

Transmission
Factory 5 speed (typical)
Clutches unknown (but no slipping)

Transfer-case
Factory outer case with 6.5 reduction gears
Rear tail shaft brake disk brake mount (no brake as of right now)
Home made HD transfer-case Cradle

Suspension
YJ/yota springs
Offset front
Front hangers in Rear (which is awesome, but unusual)
Rear has rebuildable flexjoints on shackles
Rebuildable Bilstein shocks

Axles
Extended driveshafts
Toyota 8" axles
Chromo front (inners/outters)
5.38s, welded
Completely trussed and armored
Non chromo rear
5.38s, welded
Armored

Steering
PSC full hydro, single ended ram, High Output pump
High steer

Wheels
37" Boggers
32 bolt allied beadlocks, 15"

Extras
9000 lb winch w/ synthetic
External roll cage
Fuel cell, unsure of size
Led light bar like all the cool kids


WB = 94"

   

   

   

   


2016 GOALS



Primary:

- Rear axle housing switch

- DOT Led Head lamps, turn signals

- Remove back half of cage that extends over the rear seat. Keeping the back rear section which holds and protects the fuel cell.

- Remove rear seat, prep to hold storage, remount high lift jack

- Figure out a convas top

- Gauges: Oil, Temp, Tach

- CB, Radio


Secondary:

- Twin redtops, marine switch

- Rear 8k winch


Ultimate Goal for 2016:


- Link suspension front and rear

- Cage rework

Also spent a bit of time underneath the rig trying to figure out how to do the link suspension.

This was the blazer rear link after it was said and done and it worked awesome, very predictable, no rear steer, and hit my 60% AS that I was shooting for...

   


Well... the samurai is a little different story. Due to the short width of the frame rails and the offset transfer-case drives shaft drops, I was struggling trying to find a way to keep her a flat belly but run a triangulated 4 link. It got to a point where I just didn't see it possible due to the very small triangulation possible to keep the rear end centered, plus I was getting close to 5 degrees of over steer (which is the ONE most important things to me since most rigs I have seen struggle out on the trails is due to a rear steering axle).

Did some research, started dabbling in the 3 link panhard idea, but still couldn't get my over/under steer numbers even close to 0 degrees.

Well, if I drop the lower links below the frame, play with the link lengths a bit, I finally came up with some very good numbers using the 4 link, But of course this now eliminates the flat belly possibility. I guess I can live with that....

Here's the close to final numbers on the rear 4 link...

   

Again, not as much triangulation as I wanted (for centering), but I am also running steel on steel heim joints which should keep the axle centered. (I believe the 45 degree rule mainly apply to those who that are running the poly/rubber bushings.


Here are my close to final front 3 link numbers...

   


Since the blazer did so well, I am trying to stay close to my AS numbers I ran on it. I loved the set up. Hopefully the samurai will continue the legacy, or maybe, be even better...
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01-16-2016, 06:41 PM
Post: #2
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
That's a really unique and interesting rig and a damn thorough write up! Can't wait to see it out on the trail.
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01-17-2016, 04:42 PM
Post: #3
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
I forgot to ad a big one to the primary list..

For those of you who know me, I have always ran a suicide knob on my steering wheels. You can do a full clock in a second which makes a huge difference when trying to hit a line at fast speed.

Well, this is no different, and will become even more important now that I have a manual transmission. One hand on the knob and one hand on the shifter. Of course, now I have three pedals and only two feet. Most of the issues I have seen with manual guys running rocks and hills is the initial gravity fall back when moving from brake to gas with one foot. And of course, the constant stalling out and starting up of the engine.

My plan is to run a hand throttle on the shifter which will act as my pedal, then all I need is one foot on the clutch and one foot on the brake at all times, only touching the gas pedal when on a regular flat trail where I have no need to jocky my feet around.

I have seen guys run bicycle brake levers before, so I will be going the same route. The only thing I have seen people having issue with is the "range" of throttle the bicycle brake lever has... meaning, there usually isn't enough cable pull to go from idol to WOT.

But anyway, this is actually a huge one that I need to get done ASAP because it will allow me full control out on the rocks.

PS. I am highly against manual transmissions in rock buggys. Stalling the engine can easily loose your line, but even worse, put you in a position with no brakes and no steering. We will see how this goes, I may plan on throwing in a 2wd auto down the road if I can do some engine upgrades.


Thanks for the support BlueCrawler! I hope to see you at the annual get together this year.
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01-17-2016, 06:21 PM
Post: #4
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
Looking forward to that as well. My rig is a 5 speed (by choice) and I am also considering a hand throttle. My Atlas is 4.3 to 1 and my axles are 5:38's but when in the huge rocks I also find myself one foot short for the pedals and wishing for a lower gear. I originally ordered an Atlas 4 speed but it would have cost me a little articulation in the rear so the GenRight guys talked me into the standard Atlas. I love it but am jealous of Cuzin Jay and his super low doubler when were in the rocks. Getting pretty good with two feet but a hand throttle might prevent a big oops this summer!
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01-17-2016, 06:56 PM
Post: #5
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
I geared my atlas to 5:1 since I was only running a sbc 350 and 4.88s. I was hoping to use it for this build but I love the idea of a divorced case, and to divorce my already existing case, it would have costed bucko bucks.

The case I am running now is a 6.5:1 lo range, but unlike the atlas, the high gear set was changed to a 1.7:1 as well, which is really the only way my 60 hp engine can spin 37s on the pavement. (I believe the 4 speed atlas would mimic this 2wd hi gear reduction, but like you, I just don't have the length.)

Just curious on why you went with a manual transmission? Like the smell of burnt clutch? Wanted to make wheeling 100 times harder? obviously I am joking...

I went through 4 autos in a 2 year life span with my buggy (I have a love-hate relationship). Manuals are reliable, durable, and failsafe... autos leave you stranded if they fail. But, autos offer what manuals never will, and that's torque cushioning which is one of the most important things, IMO, on the rocks. Plus eliminates the possibility of engine stall and reduces the risk of driveline failure.

The only other reason I could see someone going with a manual is if it sees the road as much as it sees the trails... I love manual trans on the streets, way more control.

I'd like to attack my hand throttle this week. Right now I am trying to find a cheap pistol grip shift knob, but don't want to drop $60 on one. Ill see what I can come up with and post up online. I am hoping that I can enjoy the manual trans because it really is A LOT LESS headache, but time will tell.




Side note, I give hell'a respect to a manual wheeler capable of keeping up with the autos on the rocks. It really is a huge disadvantage and should be added to the skill of the driver.
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01-17-2016, 08:27 PM (This post was last modified: 01-17-2016 08:29 PM by AlvarezMetalWorks.)
Post: #6
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
Have you guys considered cutting brakes rather than a hand throttle. That would kill to birds with one stone. You can use your feet for the clutch and the throttle while using your hand for the cutting brakes. If you get a two lever setup you can actually use those brakes to pivot your rig in tight spaces. Granted this would require a selectable locker to use them to steer...

Just an idea. I've been thinking about this and think the cutting brakes will be the route I take.

Check out the link to see what I'm talking about. http://amzn.to/1nsu9Ic

Alvarez Metal Works
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01-17-2016, 08:58 PM
Post: #7
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
Not a bad idea.

We have a single cutter on the vw buggy. The only problem, at least on the buggy, is that even pulled as hard as possible... I could never get the wheels to lock up.

Now, the single is forward and back... we had it hooked left and right side, just like a tractor brake for making tighter turns. So that means I was only really trying to lock up one side... but even so, it seemed like a very weak brake.

Correct me if I am wrong, but using a cutting brake bypasses the brake booster?

If this is the case, stalling my engine out on a hill and loosing vacuum to the booster, it takes my full body weight on the foot brakes to lock up the tires to keep a vehicle from rolling down a hill (this is from experience) I can only imagine the amount of force it would take to keep a buggy from rolling by using a hand cutting brake without the help of a booster.

The other benefit of a hand throttle is being able to brake, shift, and throttle at the same time without switching hands or feet.

But I have seen quite a few buggys with cutters in them, but they may be specifically for cutting rear and front independently for front and rear digs.

Ill do some research and see what people are doing. I have that transfer case brake I can finish installing that would work great for a cutter. I just think I would be wheeling and doing a work out at the same time.

Think cutting brakes are out of the question, from what I am reading on different forums, they are having the same problem I was having with the vw rail...

If you ran a selectable locker in the rear and was capable of doing front digs, that would be the ticket for tight turns. But I don't think it would be that practical for trying to lock up all 4 tires on a steep grade, or at least I don't think I would have enough strength to lock em up.. and to do it over and over again would be tiring..

If there was a way to hook it to the booster, then I could see it being very feasible and might even work better than a hand throttle as far as throttle control and braking control, and anything is possible for sure!

There you go Rafael, see if you can figure out a cutting brake system using the booster that would be tits.
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01-17-2016, 09:34 PM
Post: #8
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
Nice rig, looking forward to see what you do with it!
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01-18-2016, 08:37 AM
Post: #9
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
(01-17-2016 08:58 PM)Dmiller Wrote:  Correct me if I am wrong, but using a cutting brake bypasses the brake booster?

Exactly right. Those VW sand rails are pretty light, I'm guessing that's how they get away with it. Seen a few guys use a ball valve or line lock solenoid. But it requires that you are already stopped before you can apply it, which may be more useful as a hill hold.


Dmiller Wrote:There you go Rafael, see if you can figure out a cutting brake system using the booster that would be tits.

I would like to see this too, I see a manual trans in the future

Too Many Projects . . .
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01-18-2016, 08:59 AM
Post: #10
RE: The Rise of Nishi!
You can get sealed beams for $8 at Walmart! That should do it!

Neat buggy. Wonder how hard it would be to do the canvas top kind of CJ style with snap buttons around the cage? Do you want ti to be completely sealed (relatively speaking) or just to keep the rain from falling out?

(01-17-2016 06:56 PM)Dmiller Wrote:  Just curious on why you went with a manual transmission? Like the smell of burnt clutch? Wanted to make wheeling 100 times harder? obviously I am joking...

I went through 4 autos in a 2 year life span with my buggy (I have a love-hate relationship). Manuals are reliable, durable, and failsafe... autos leave you stranded if they fail. But, autos offer what manuals never will, and that's torque cushioning which is one of the most important things, IMO, on the rocks. Plus eliminates the possibility of engine stall and reduces the risk of driveline failure.

The only other reason I could see someone going with a manual is if it sees the road as much as it sees the trails... I love manual trans on the streets, way more control.

I borrowed a 5 speed jeep (the gray XJ that uh had a small oil leak) at the 2015 Anniversary run. It was nice that I could just let it walk along in 4lo, 1st gear and it would go up or down hills without any input. I do not like having to ride the brake all the time with the auto. Plus, if it blows a line - there isn't any stopping it.

I didn't care for it on anything tight or hilly / rocky. I did stall it a few times. I don't like giving throttle when starting out from a stop and there were a few cases where I should have given it a little. It was also geared a bit tall.

I think I could do it and like it a lot if I had something geared really low. The thing with J**ps is - the only ones that came with good automatic transmissions were the FSJs with the TH400, Cherokees with AW-4 and the JKs with the benz 5 speed auto.

I have been on trail rides in the past where I smell burning clutch all day.

Mike
2000 XJ Cherokee - 3.5'' lift / 32'' Tirerecapper Pizza Cutters / Front Locker
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